This is a national crisis – not the time for a pointless Tory feud

So begins an epic waste of time and a monumental exercise in displacement activity. The Conservatives have taken a look at the scale of the crisis facing the country and decided their best response is to turn inwards and talk about themselves. With the Brexit clock ticking ever louder, they have retreated into the comfort zone to engage in their favourite pastime – a round of navel-gazing and internecine bloodletting.

This is a national crisis – not the time for a pointless Tory feud

So begins an epic waste of time and a monumental exercise in displacement activity. The Conservatives have taken a look at the scale of the crisis facing the country and decided their best response is to turn inwards and talk about themselves. With the Brexit clock ticking ever louder, they have retreated into the comfort zone to engage in their favourite pastime – a round of navel-gazing and internecine bloodletting.

The country will pay the price for May’s Brexit vote delay

When Lord Salisbury said that “delay is life”, he was voicing a doctrine of conservatism that sought to hold back the tides of change for as long as possible. But the phrase has another value, expressing an enduring truth about political tactics: for a politician under pressure, delay is a vital friend.

It’s crunch time for Labour. Empty posturing on Brexit will no longer do

Normally, an opposition could enjoy a week like the one that’s coming. It could sit back, relax and break open the popcorn as Theresa May walks into a Commons defeat on the policy that has defined her premiership. It could delight in yet more days of debate in which next to no one on the prime minister’s own benches rises to speak up for her, savouring the sight of a governing party that is devouring itself in full public view.

In this high-stakes game of Brexit, how much of a gambler are you?

In the dead of night, I have been reliving the 2016 referendum. While the autumn rain beats against the windows, and as winter draws nearer, I have been plunged back into those hot, fevered days of two and a half years ago: Nigel Farage beaming beside his “Breaking Point” poster, with its snaking horde of dark-skinned migrants; the shock and sorrow of that same day, as we learned that the Labour MP Jo Cox had been murdered; the bitterness of the arguments that split friendships and broke families. It’s all come back to me.

US democracy is in crisis. But Trump is only the symptom

The talk in the US is of constitutional crisis. It’s been looming for a while, thanks to the Mueller investigation into suspected collusion between the Trump campaign and Kremlin efforts to swing the 2016 election. At some point – perhaps when special counsel Robert Mueller issues a subpoena, demanding Donald Trump answers his questions – a clash was bound to come. But it may already be upon us.

Trump lost the House, but he lives to fight – and lie – another day

A useful rule for the Trump era is, listen to what the man says – and then believe the opposite. On that logic his tweet of self-congratulation in the early hours, praising himself for his “tremendous success” in Tuesday’s midterm elections surely suggests abject failure. And there is plenty of evidence to support that conclusion.

Why these Trump midterms will affect everyone – not just Americans

Every US election, presidential or midterm, is always hailed as the most important of our lifetimes, at least by the candidates stumping for votes. But this time the hype may actually be justified. The vote that will take place on Tuesday – electing a new House of Representatives, one third of the Senate and a slew of governorships – could not be more significant. To Americans, most obviously, but to a watching world too. It is a referendum on the age of Donald Trump, delivering a verdict on whether the last two years has been a horror show to be repudiated or a model to be advanced and copied.