A national unity government? A second referendum is more likely

Two is a coincidence, but three’s a trend – and now three Tory MPs in the space of 24 hours have uttered the phrase “national unity government”. It sounds fantastical, in a country that has had no such thing for three-quarters of a century, but could it happen – and should it?

Published by: The Guardian

A national unity government? A second referendum is more likely

Two is a coincidence, but three’s a trend – and now three Tory MPs in the space of 24 hours have uttered the phrase “national unity government”. It sounds fantastical, in a country that has had no such thing for three-quarters of a century, but could it happen – and should it?

Published by: The Guardian

Alone, Britain is easy prey for Trump. It must hug Europe close

Vladimir Putin must be dreading Monday’s edition of Komsomolskaya Pravda, Russia’s big and breezy tabloid. It will doubtless splash on an explosive interview with Donald Trump ahead of his visit to Moscow, in which the US president will slam Putin’s handling of the war in Syria, suggest US-Russian relations are doomed and lavish praise on the Russian leader’s “very talented” rival. Poor Vladimir must be quaking in his boots.

Published by: The Guardian

Why is the BBC downplaying the Facebook Brexit scandal?

One of the joys of the news business is that, no matter how long you’ve been at it, you can still never be certain what will count as news. It’s an unstable category, one that changes shape depending on timing, context and, crucially, who’s deciding.

Published by: The Guardian

Why is the BBC downplaying the Facebook Brexit scandal?

One of the joys of the news business is that, no matter how long you’ve been at it, you can still never be certain what will count as news. It’s an unstable category, one that changes shape depending on timing, context and, crucially, who’s deciding.

Published by: The Guardian

England’s win shows you can shake off the past – and not just on the pitch

The nation’s new spiritual leader, Zen master and guide, Gareth Southgate, tells us not to get carried away, and we should surely heed his wisdom. We must not get overexcited, either with premature hopes of England winning the World Cup or – and this is a particular danger for those of us in the punditry business – with overanalysing the meaning of Tuesday’s penalty shootout victory over Colombia.

Published by: The Guardian

Inspired by Trump, the world could be heading back to the 1930s

You’ll remember Godwin’s law, which holds that the longer an online debate goes on, the likelier it is that someone will mention Hitler or the Nazis. It was an amusing observation and one that served a useful purpose, guarding against hyperbole and fatuous comparison. Except last August, as the American far right staged a torchlight parade in Charlottesville, Mike Godwin suspended his own law. “By all means, compare these shitheads to Nazis,” he tweeted. “Again and again. I’m with you.”

Published by: The Guardian

Trump prefers strongmen. But democracy is not a weakness

In the lexicon of Donald Trump, the insult of choice is “weak”. He hurled it at Justin Trudeau last weekend, though not to his face: Trump waited till he was safely on Air Force One, having made an early exit from the G7 summit hosted by the Canadian prime minister, to tweet that Trudeau was “dishonest and weak” on the matter of trade. Thus Trudeau joined a long list – one that includes multiple Democratic politicians, former Republican rivals and Trump’s own attorney general – of those branded weak by the would-be strongman in the White House.

Published by: The Guardian