After Tunisia, Kuwait and France we should not be afraid to call evil by its name

In France, in Tunisia, in Kuwait – horror upon horror, in a single day. It played out like some kind of gruesome auction, each atrocity bidding against the others for our appalled attention. The opening offer came near Lyon, where a factory was attacked and, more shocking, a severed head was found on top of a gate, and a decapitated body nearby. The French president said the corpse had been inscribed with a message.

Published by: The Guardian

Shaken by a stunning racist

It's hardly made headlines here, but one striking feature of the new Israeli government is the presence of several vocal, forceful and trenchantly right-wing women. The Minister of Culture is Miri Regev, who achieved notoriety in 2012 when she describe...

Published by: The Jewish Chronicle

Kinabalu’s naked backpackers were thinking of Las Vegas, not Rome

Somewhere between Rome and Las Vegas stands the island of Borneo and its highest peak, Mount Kinabalu. Not literally, you understand. But in the map of our minds, its contours formed by our confused, conflicting attitudes to travel, tourism and the way we are meant to behave when we venture beyond these shores.

Published by: The Guardian

Labour has to get over its Tony Blair problem

For at least two decades Margaret Thatcher haunted the Conservative party. The guilt over her regicide, the fear that they would never find a leader to match her, the urge to do her will by distancing Britain from the hated European enterprise – one way or another, the Thatcher ghost refused to rest. Perhaps David Cameron’s unexpected success on 7 May will allow an exorcism of sorts, but her shade still lingers. The coming referendum on Europe will, for many Tories, carry a spectral echo of her famous battle cry: “No. No. No.”

Published by: The Guardian

Ukip looks hilarious. But soon we won’t be laughing

There are times when you have to remind yourself that Ukip is not a branch of the light entertainment industry. The delights the UK Independence party served up on Thursday would have qualified for a Bafta in the comedy category, at the very least.

Published by: The Guardian

Damned by his own words

Twice in 10 years, the British people have had the chance to elect a Jewish prime minister - and twice they've said no. Michael Howard took on Tony Blair in 2005 and failed. And, last week, 1a>Ed Miliband followed Howard into the pantheon of electoral losers1b>.

Published by: The Jewish Chronicle