It’s not a playground spat

One of the joys of being the father of a teenage son is getting to glimpse, thanks to him, videos that have gone viral. The latest was made in 2012 but it's spread anew among Jewish teens. It's a South Park-style cartoon that, without words, depicts th...

Published by: The Jewish Chronicle

This cycle of vengeance could spark a third intifada

The tit-for-tat killings of Israeli and Palestinian teenagers have raised the prospect of another, even bloodier confrontationThe faces are, if not the same, then similar. The smiling boys in the photographs look like each other and like teenage boys...

Published by: The Guardian

Gordon Brown is back, and may be the man to save the union

Tony Blair was on the front page of the Financial Times this week, as the paper brought word of the former prime minister's plan to open an office in "the increasingly assertive oil-rich emirate" of Abu Dhabi. The FT explained that Blair is expanding his portfolio of business and other interests in the Middle East, which already includes a contract to advise Mubadala, one of Abu Dhabi's mighty sovereign wealth funds.

Published by: The Guardian

Why Britain still wants to fight Europe on the beaches

As D-day reminds us, the EU was born out of war, and Britain's heroic view of that conflict shapes its hostile attitudeThe beaches are quiet now, every last trace of blood washed away. When I covered the 60th anniversary commemorations of D-day in...

Published by: The Guardian

London is Ukip’s worst nightmare

The local election results highlight how out-of-step London attitudes pose a serious dilemma for Labour and ToriesThe past is a foreign country, we've long known that. Scotland is another country, that's the theme of the dominant political battle of th...

Published by: The Guardian

Halal meat: animals shouldn’t suffer, but we mustn’t ostracise minorities

Halal, is it meat you're looking for? Much as I'd like to, I can't claim credit for that gag, a Lionel Richie parody given a new airing this week alongside the hashtag #halalhysteria, as British Muslims once again found their dietary customs at the centre of a moral panic. Other minorities have learned that same survival strategy when a collective finger is pointed menacingly in their direction: better to laugh, otherwise you'll cry.

Published by: The Guardian

Whatever Gerry Adams’ past, peace takes precedence over justice

The faces of both Michael McConville and his older sister Helen are haunting because they are haunted. They are in middle age now. He is 53 and she is 57, and yet to see them interviewed about the 1972 abduction and murder of their mother Jean is to glimpse the children they were. Etched on Michael's face is the fear he must have felt as an 11-year-old boy when he witnessed an IRA gang, most wearing masks, barge into their home in the Divis flats in west Belfast and take away their mother. The masked men had to pull the woman from the arms of her 10 children, who were "crying and squealing". As McConville told the BBC, the fear has not left him; it's what prevents him naming his mother's killers now, even though he is convinced he knows who they are.

Published by: The Guardian