Donald Trump speaks to the gut – and progressives need to do the same | Jonathan Freedland

To win this election Hillary Clinton should learn the lesson of Brexit. You can’t disdain the politics of emotion - you have to master it

When they come to make Trump: The Movie, what will be the plot? For a long while I’d thought the obvious structure was that of The Producers, the classic Mel Brooks tale of the Broadway duo who realise they can make a fortune by staging a surefire flop. To hold on to their investors’ money, they set about sabotaging their own show, making it as repellent as possible. The showstopper is the appalling, offensive dance number Springtime for Hitler. The trouble is, the audience love it.

Surely that’s the only plausible explanation for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. How else to explain why he would launch it by insulting whole classes of people, including those usually seen as beyond criticism. Mocking a disabled man, quipping that John McCain, a PoW in Vietnam, was not a real war hero because he was captured, or suggesting a Fox News host took against him because she was “bleeding from her whatever”. These moves are to electoral success what goose-stepping Nazis are to Broadway musicals: they’re not meant to work.

Related: Trump's comments on Russia denounced as 'shocking and dangerous'

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Trump doesn’t have to be Putin’s agent. It’s bad enough that he is a fan | Jonathan Freedland

Whatever the conspiracy theories, praise, policy concessions and business links all suggest a President Trump would model himself on Russia’s strongman

It’s quite a contrast. In 1984, Ronald Reagan won re-election with the help, in part, of a TV ad that began with the memorable line, “There’s a bear in the woods.” Without ever mentioning Soviet Russia by name, the ad played on cold war fears to suggest that only Reagan was prepared to face down the menace from the east. Back then, it was taken as read that the US Republican party would stand strong against an authoritarian, undemocratic regime in Moscow.

Related: Russia may well be meddling in the US election. Why wouldn't it? | Mary Dejevsky

The two of them could then do business with no regard for international law, the international system or human rights

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Trump doesn’t have to be Putin’s agent. It’s bad enough that he is a fan | Jonathan Freedland

Whatever the conspiracy theories, praise, policy concessions and business links all suggest a President Trump would model himself on Russia’s strongman

It’s quite a contrast. In 1984, Ronald Reagan won re-election with the help, in part, of a TV ad that began with the memorable line, “There’s a bear in the woods.” Without ever mentioning Soviet Russia by name, the ad played on cold war fears to suggest that only Reagan was prepared to face down the menace from the east. Back then, it was taken as read that the US Republican party would stand strong against an authoritarian, undemocratic regime in Moscow.

Related: Russia may well be meddling in the US election. Why wouldn't it? | Mary Dejevsky

The two of them could then do business with no regard for international law, the international system or human rights

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As Trump backers praise Brexit, UK and US are nations united in rage

Patriotic, misogynistic mood among Republicans is more lurid than what’s seen in Britain, but the echo is distinct

Donald Trump’s noisy, shambolic and furious convention in Cleveland broke every rule in the US campaigners’ handbook – including the relatively esoteric one that says British politics never, ever gets a mention. Deemed both obscure and irrelevant, the affairs of the UK have been reliably invisible from the US political argument since 1945.

But not this week. Alongside a speech from a would-be first lady rapidly exposed as plagiarised and a primetime address from a US senator drowned by boos from the convention floor, the Republican gathering in Cleveland also recorded another first. It made room for interest in Britain.

Related: Trump accuses Cruz of 'dishonorable' changes to convention speech – campaign live

Related: Hatred for Hillary Clinton is the great Republican party unifier | Matt Laslo

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‘He’s a disaster’: Trump still faces a party divided on convention’s final night

Many delegates in Cleveland remain unconvinced of Trump’s presidential bid as a discordant convention comes to a close: ‘This is not how a leader behaves’

Donald Trump, the self-declared king of deal-makers, faces the toughest negotiation of his career on Thursday night when he arrives on stage in Cleveland to close the final night of a Republican party convention riven by discord and disharmony.

The booing of Texas senator Ted Cruz, who failed to endorse Trump in his speech on Wednesday night, exposed how even as the nominee tries to pull the party together, he presides over a house divided between true believers, reluctant fellow travellers and dissidents still refusing to accept his victory.

Related: Republican convention live: Cruz speech sets up test for Trump on day four

There are a lot of conservatives who can’t vote for Trump in good conscience. It’s a lost cause

We have to be realistic, Donald Trump is our nominee. He is our only hope to be able to defeat Hillary Clinton

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The targeting of Hillary Clinton suggests a vicious campaign ahead | Jonathan Freedland

The Republicans have shown how they want to take on the Democratic frontrunner, by framing her as a criminal. The result will be relentless negativity

We now know how Donald Trump will take on Hillary Clinton this autumn – by framing her as a criminal who should be sent not to the White House, but to jail.

Trump had already signalled as much via the two-word label he likes to hang around the neck of his Democratic opponent: Crooked Hillary. But the Republican convention in Cleveland, which on Tuesday formally nominated Trump as its presidential candidate, has given colour and shape to that strategy. Now we know how it will look and sound.

Republican crowd chants "lock her up" about Hillary Clinton. Chris Christie: "All right, we're getting there" https://t.co/A7BCEidbl0

And a poster on a Cleveland street corner as the city prepares for the anointing of Donald Trump #RNC2016 pic.twitter.com/4cs4OD5OmO

Related: Backing for the wall spells the end of Republican decency | John Paul Brammer

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Trump’s Republican party hits new low: relentless exploitation of genuine grief

No one could deny the agony of the parade of grieving parents and siblings at the convention’s opening night, but it felt like an appalling abuse of their suffering

To the serial dishonesty, overt racism and jaw-dropping sexism, we can now add a new, more subtle layer of shame to Donald Trump’s campaign to be president: the relentless exploitation of genuine grief and heartbreaking pain.

The first night of the Republican convention in Cleveland was devoted to a simple theme: Make America Safe Again. But that idea was pursued not by the presentation of a new law and order policy or a fresh military doctrine, but by a procession of grieving parents and siblings, telling of the soldiers or victims of crime they had lost over the past eight years – and blaming Hillary Clinton, along with Barack Obama, for their deaths.

Related: The Guardian view on the Republican convention: Angry America sees red | Editorial

Related: Republican platform formalizes push for Donald Trump's Mexico border wall

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With Boris Johnson in charge of diplomacy, Britain has insulted the world | Jonathan Freedland

Some say his role is merely symbolic. Even so it gives two fingers to the countries whose goodwill we will need

Theresa May could scarcely have made a worse choice of foreign secretary than Boris Johnson. Short of appointing Nigel Farage, or Jeremy Clarkson, the new prime minister could not have made a more reckless decision, one that smacks of the fateful error made by her predecessor – putting the demands of party management ahead of the needs of the country.

Related: Never have we needed diplomacy more. Instead we have Boris Johnson | Sonia Purnell

It's just Boris being Boris, we say, as if life were just one extended episode of Have I Got News for You

Related: The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: no joke at all | Editorial

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