We’re marching towards a mad Brexit. Someone must speak for the 48%

Among the multiple absurdities uttered by those who demanded Britain’s departure from the European Union is the claim that, since the sky has not yet fallen in, all those gloomy warnings from the remain crowd have been proved wrong. Absurd because – and it’s odd that they haven’t spotted this – we have not yet left. We remainers believed that it was the actual leaving, not a mere vote to leave, that would bring economic havoc. That the first few post-referendum months seemed steady enough can be attributed to the hope nurtured by some of our trading partners, along with the markets, that we might not go ahead with this planned act of national self-harm, that we might step back from the brink.

Published by: The Guardian

Jeremy Corbyn could heal Labour’s immigration divide. Sadly, he’s doing the opposite

A hundred days on and the talk around Brexit is as delusional as ever. This week it fell to Liam Fox, the international trade secretary, who is not allowed to negotiate international trade – that’s Brussels’ job until Britain leaves – to add to the already thick fog of fantasy. Fox declared that, after the UK had left the EU, it would enjoy terms of commerce with Europe “at least as free” as those we had when we were still in. That makes perfect sense – if you think the EU’s remaining 27 members are itching to show that exiting the EU exacts no cost, staying brings no benefits and others should start following us out the door.

Published by: The Guardian