One tragedy after another – what’s this summer doing to us?

Under normal circumstances the tragedies of the last month would each be the defining event of an entire year, argues Jonathan Freedland. But in the last month we have been forced to grieve at an unprecedented rate, and the risk is that our wounds will not properly heal – or worse, that we will grow used to tragedy

Published by: The Guardian

Grenfell Tower will forever stand as a rebuke to the right

You walk around and it might be Westminster or the Manchester Arena or London Bridge, or even New York in the days after 9/11. In the shadow of Grenfell Tower, the trappings of grief: the signs pleading for the safe return of the missing, the vigil candles, the notes and messages left for the dead. People stand in stunned clusters, talking to each other, to police, to reporters, telling of the horror they’ve witnessed, recalling the pain of a friend’s final message or a father whose phone rang and rang but was never answered.

Published by: The Guardian

Why the Tories are blaming anything but May for election disaster

They say success has a thousand parents while failure is an orphan. But judging by the argument now raging inside the Conservative party, what failure lacks in parents it makes up for in guides and tutors – all now queuing up to explain last week’s Tory debacle in terms that, surprise, surprise, neatly fit their prior political positions.

Published by: The Guardian

So … what happens now? Election Daily podcast

Jonathan Freedland and Owen Jones are joined by Polly Toynbee in the last of our Election Daily podcasts. The dust still hasn’t settled from Friday’s shock results, so what now for Labour? What now for the country? And how long for Theresa May?

Published by: The Guardian

Jeremy Corbyn didn’t win – but he has rewritten all the rules

Of the three political earthquakes that have shaken the western political landscape in the past year – Brexit, Trump and Thursday’s general election – the latest has a claim to be the biggest shock of all. Remember that remain and leave were neck and neck in the opinion polls in the days leading up to the EU referendum: a leave win always looked a possibility. In the US, surveys regularly showed Donald Trump just a couple of points behind Hillary Clinton in the popular vote, which is exactly how things turned out.

Published by: The Guardian