Beware the great betrayal myth. This debacle is the work of hard Brexiters

There is no deader horse in the kingdom than the deal brokered by Theresa May. Flogged and flogged again, it expired for a third time at 2.42pm today on the floor of the House of Commons. Something else lay dead alongside it: the illusion that the objection of MPs was not to the precise terms of Britain’s proposed exit from the European Union – contained in the withdrawal agreement – but rather to the sketched vision of our future relationship with the EU, the so-called political declaration. That fond thought was also bludgeoned to death, for MPs had the chance to vote on the withdrawal agreement alone – and they rejected it by 344 votes to 286.

Think no-deal Brexit has been taken off the table? Think again

The cliff-edge has moved a tiny bit further away, but it’s still there. Britain will not crash out of the European Union next Friday, thanks to a last act of clemency by the 27 nations we’re about to leave behind. But crashing out remains a possibility, even a likelihood. It might not be a deliberate choice made by the people of these islands, but rather an accident – the product of a series of decisions that were taken and, more often, not taken. Just as the imperial powers stumbled into a war no one wanted in 1914, so the risk remains that we will not jump off the cliff that looms ahead of us, but stumble over it.

‘They did it out of desperation’ – David Owen on the Independent Group, May’s failure and why he stands by Brexit

David Owen’s claim to be a visionary is lodged even before he opens his front door. He lives in Limehouse – in the same house where he and his fellow Labour rebels formed the breakaway Social Democratic party (SDP) in 1981, issuing the Limehouse declaration, which would change the course of British politics. It is in a part of east London that was derelict when Owen bought a burnt-out old cafe and the rooms above it for £3,000 in 1965. He was a young doctor at St Thomas’s hospital back then and this corner of Docklands was ready for the bulldozers.

May’s latest screeching U-turn makes her utterly unfit to lead

No matter how bad you think Theresa May is, she always manages to get worse. Her record of insisting on one thing, only to U-turn weeks, days or even hours later is almost impressive in its scope. There would be no snap election, she vowed – and then there was one. Her Brexit deal would be subject to a meaningful vote in December – and then the vote was pulled, punted into the new year. Brexit would happen on 29 March – and now it won’t.

May’s latest screeching U-turn makes her utterly unfit to lead

No matter how bad you think Theresa May is, she always manages to get worse. Her record of insisting on one thing, only to U-turn weeks, days or even hours later is almost impressive in its scope. There would be no snap election, she vowed – and then there was one. Her Brexit deal would be subject to a meaningful vote in December – and then the vote was pulled, punted into the new year. Brexit would happen on 29 March – and now it won’t.

To prevent another Christchurch we must confront the right’s hate preachers

There are coping strategies for dealing with terrorism and the feeling it is meant to induce, namely terror. One is to tell yourself, it won’t happen to me. Following the massacre of 49 people at prayer in two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, many non-Muslims might be saying to themselves, if only in a guilty whisper, “I am not Muslim, I’ll be OK.” Another strategy is to tell yourself, it won’t happen here. That’s hard, though, for if it can happen in a country that has long seen itself as a serene haven, distant from a turbulent world, then it can surely happen anywhere. And still others may fall back on that perennial reassurance: this was just one deranged individual.

Theresa May has finally got the Brexiters where she wants them

MPs had the chance to take back control of Brexit – wresting this tortured process from a weak, flailing and moribund government – and they ducked it. Sure, it was by the narrowest of margins, losing by just two votes, 312 to 314, but MPs passed up the opportunity to take charge and say, at long last, what kind of Brexit they want. They preferred instead to grant Theresa May yet another lifeline for her own deal – which, incredibly, will come back for a third meaningful vote on Tuesday.

Theresa May has finally got the Brexiters where she wants them

MPs had the chance to take back control of Brexit – wresting this tortured process from a weak, flailing and moribund government – and they ducked it. Sure, it was by the narrowest of margins, losing by just two votes, 312 to 314, but MPs passed up the opportunity to take charge and say, at long last, what kind of Brexit they want. They preferred instead to grant Theresa May yet another lifeline for her own deal – which, incredibly, will come back for a third meaningful vote on Tuesday.

The Conservatives have left Britain with no real government

It’s been true for a while that the Conservative party has become fundamentally ungovernable, its warring factions so far apart it’s all but impossible to have them marching in the same direction, at least when it comes to Europe. It’s a condition that afflicted the Tories under Theresa May’s predecessors, spelling doom for David Cameron, John Major and Margaret Thatcher. But today Britain has to face a condition that is new: not only are the Conservatives ungovernable but, under the Tories, the country itself is ungoverned. Functionally, the United Kingdom currently lacks a government.