My dad showed me how to be a journalist, a Jew and a man

If it were up to me, I’d write this piece next week or perhaps the week after. Let the dust settle a bit. But I have my father’s voice in my head, and he’s insistent: the story is now, so you write it now. No one wants to read last week’s news. I’m listening to that voice because my father, Michael, died unexpectedly this week. He was a journalist to his core. He started at age 16, straight out of school in 1951, on his local paper, the Luton News – and once he’d started, he never stopped.

Kavanaugh has revealed the insidious force in global politics: toxic masculinity

When Donald Trump speaks the truth, it’s usually by accident. A choice example came late on last night, after TV audiences in the US and around the world were riveted by the sight of Trump’s choice for the supreme court ranting and raving, his face twisted in fury, as he insisted he was innocent of the sexual assault that had just been detailed in calm, precise terms by Christine Blasey Ford. “Judge Kavanaugh showed America exactly why I nominated him,” Trump tweeted, the statement truer and more revealing than he realised.

Why Brett Kavanaugh is still the trump card for US conservatives

By now, and just as matter of raw politics, you’d have thought Brett Kavanaugh would have been withdrawn as Donald Trump’s nominee for the US supreme court. Instead the US political class is girding itself for a moment of pure drama on Thursday, when the judge’s prime accuser – a woman who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers – comes before a senate committee to testify.

Why Brett Kavanaugh is still the trump card for US conservatives

By now, and just as matter of raw politics, you’d have thought Brett Kavanaugh would have been withdrawn as Donald Trump’s nominee for the US supreme court. Instead the US political class is girding itself for a moment of pure drama on Thursday, when the judge’s prime accuser – a woman who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers – comes before a senate committee to testify.

We now need a people’s vote on Brexit. But don’t assume remain would win

The hills were alive with the sound of humiliation. At Salzburg, Theresa May was hoping she’d hear if not sweet music, then at least enough warm words from European leaders to allow her to say her Chequers plan still lived. Instead, they told her it “would not work”. Stung by that, she took to the Downing Street podium on Friday to deliver an icy death stare in Brussels’ direction – and to demand that the EU treat Britain, and her, with “respect”. There was even a hint that talks could break down, if the EU did not explain its objections and come up with counter-proposals.

We now need a people’s vote on Brexit. But don’t assume remain would win

The hills were alive with the sound of humiliation. At Salzburg, Theresa May was hoping she’d hear if not sweet music, then at least enough warm words from European leaders to allow her to say her Chequers plan still lived. Instead, they told her it “would not work”. Stung by that, she took to the Downing Street podium on Friday to deliver an icy death stare in Brussels’ direction – and to demand that the EU treat Britain, and her, with “respect”. There was even a hint that talks could break down, if the EU did not explain its objections and come up with counter-proposals.

Russia’s brazen lies mock the world. How best to fight for the truth?

Comedy is now diplomacy by other means. A mighty nation has taken to conducting a grave international dispute by means of humour, expecting a similarly comic response in kind. How else are we to view the interview granted with RT, the state propaganda outfit formerly known as Russia Today, by the Morecambe and Wise of the east, the two men who identified themselves as Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov?