Welcome to the age of Trump

It was the night the American media were too demure to call Pussygate. At the time, Donald Trump had won nothing. Twenty-four hours later, he would be celebrating his first victory in the contest for the Republican presidential nomination, setting him on the path to face Hillary Clinton in November. But on this frigid Monday night in February, while a blizzard whipped outside, Trump stood before a packed Verizon Wireless Arena in Manchester, New Hampshire and prepared to unleash his tongue.

Published by: The Guardian

Whatever the Queen says, this parliament’s all about Europe

No one will blame you if you’ve forgotten it, but there was a Queen’s speech, outlining the upcoming programme of the UK government, in 2003 too. There were some things in it that would have a lasting impact, like the introduction of civil partnerships for same sex couples, preparing the ground for eventual equal marriage. And there were proposals that came to nothing. Her Majesty promised a “national identity cards scheme”, that would later be dropped, and amusing to recall, said that “A draft bill will be published to enable a referendum to be held on the adoption of the single currency subject to the government’s five economic tests being met”.

Published by: The Guardian

Post-truth politicians such as Donald Trump and Boris Johnson are no joke

In this era of post-truth politics, an unhesitating liar can be king. The more brazen his dishonesty, the less he minds being caught with his pants on fire, the more he can prosper. And those pedants still hung up on facts and evidence and all that boring stuff are left for dust, their boots barely laced while the lie has spread halfway around the world.

Published by: The Guardian

Labour’s argument won’t be settled until 2020. By then it will be too late

The most important result of Thursday’s elections across the UK, the one that will have an enduring impact and great meaning beyond these islands, is - should it be confirmed – the election of Sadiq Khan as mayor of London. The symbolism will be potent. London, the most diverse city on the planet and one of the great cities of the world, will have chosen a Muslim as its leader.

Published by: The Guardian

Election victory should be Labour’s on Thursday – losses will be inexcusable

When people speak of midterm elections, or midterm blues, the “term” they have in mind is usually that of the government. Ordinarily, such contests are seen as a test of strength for the governing party of the day, with a working assumption that the incumbents will do badly, as voters seize the chance to poke a finger in the eye of their masters.

Published by: The Guardian

My plea to the left: treat Jews the same way you’d treat any other minority

Let’s imagine for just a moment that a small but vocal section of the left was consumed with hatred for one faraway country: barely an hour could pass without them condemning it, not just for this or for that policy, but for its very existence, for the manner of its birth, for what it represented. And now let’s imagine that this country was the only place in the world where the majority of the population, and most of the government, were black.

Published by: The Guardian

AB Yehoshua: ‘Instead of dealing with Palestine, the new generation do a play or write a story’

They are, if not the holy trinity, then at least the hallowed trio. Amos Oz, David Grossman and AB Yehoshua – once hailed as “the three tenors” of Israeli literature, who have for decades served an exalted double role. Inside the country, they are the unofficial liberal conscience of the nation: delivering rousing speeches at demonstrations or firing off newspaper polemics that burn with righteous indignation, whether lamenting Israel’s march rightward, denouncing its presence in the territories occupied since 1967 or making the deeply unfashionable case for peace with the Palestinians. Outside Israel, where literary prizes are heaped on them with unflagging regularity, they offer those same red-hot criticisms – but at the same time, and with no contradiction, also mount a defence of Israel itself: not its governments, but its right to be there and what they see as its enduring necessity.

Published by: The Guardian