The ‘peaceful’ decade that set up our current turmoil

To voter fatigue we can add news fatigue. When Theresa May announced a June election, to add to the votes Britons had already cast in 2015 and 2016, to say nothing of the Scottish referendum in 2014, only part of the reaction – captured so perfectly by Brenda, she of the viral “Not another one!” video – was weariness at the prospect of enduring yet more politics. There is a wider exhaustion too, at the sheer pace of events.

Published by: The Guardian

The real gamble for Theresa May would have been to wait until 2020

The standard way of describing a move such as the one Theresa May made on Tuesday morning is to call it a “gamble”. A prime minister with a Commons majority and three years left to run on her parliamentary term does not throw that away without risk. In that sense, May has gambled – but as gambles go, it’s about the surest bet any politician could ever place.

Published by: The Guardian

Trump’s airstrike: a convenient U-turn from a president who can’t be trusted

Sometimes the right thing can be done by the wrong person. Donald Trump’s bombing of a Syrian airfield seems to belong in that category, though even that verdict depends on events yet to unfold. For one thing, we don’t yet know if the 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles that rained down on the Shayrat base in the early hours of Friday morning were a one-off or the start of something more.

Published by: The Guardian

Inaction over Syria’s gas attack will exact a terrible price

Let’s not speak of our horror. Let’s not hold emergency meetings or pass urgent resolutions expressing our outrage at the poisoning of Syrian children and adults in Idlib province through a nerve agent, probably sarin gas. Let’s have no declarations worded in the “strongest possible terms”. Let’s utter no more cliches about acts that “cannot be ignored”. Let’s not even condemn these attacks any more – because our condemnations ring so hollow.

Published by: The Guardian

May wants security, free trade, liberal values: just what we’re throwing away

Nothing conveyed the madness of Brexit like the implementing of it. Theresa May’s speech to the Commons delighted the anti-EU warriors – of course it did. The likes of Victoria Borthwick, the Kensington MP who wore an alice band in Union Jack colours for the occasion, or Bill Cash and John Redwood, for decades dismissed as backbench eccentrics for demanding a British departure from the European Union, were ecstatic at the prime minister’s announcement of what they saw as Britain’s day of liberation. They bellowed their joy when the PM declared that article 50 had been triggered, and: “This is a historic moment from which there will be no turning back.”

Published by: The Guardian

May wants security, free trade, liberal values: just what we’re throwing away

Nothing conveyed the madness of Brexit like the implementing of it. Theresa May’s speech to the Commons delighted the anti-EU warriors – of course it did. The likes of Victoria Borthwick, the Kensington MP who wore an alice band in Union Jack colours for the occasion, or Bill Cash and John Redwood, for decades dismissed as backbench eccentrics for demanding a British departure from the European Union, were ecstatic at the prime minister’s announcement of what they saw as Britain’s day of liberation. They bellowed their joy when the PM declared that article 50 had been triggered, and: “This is a historic moment from which there will be no turning back.”

Published by: The Guardian