Netanyahu’s victory means life is about to get worse for Palestinians

Think of it as Israel’s groundhog night. It begins with exit polls that delight Benjamin Netanyahu’s opponents and send a shudder through Likud headquarters, and ends several hours later with a crowd of supporters cheering “Bibi, king of Israel”. It happened that way in 1996, when Netanyahu won his first term as prime minister, it happened again in 2015, and it happened once more last night. The initial projection, which saw Netanyahu lagging behind Benny Gantz, a former chief of staff of the military, melted away as the night wore on, until both men had an even number of seats – but with Netanyahu the obvious winner thanks to the overall strength of the bloc of rightist and religious parties that he calls his “natural partners” in coalition. Not all the votes have been counted, but barring an arithmetical miracle he will soon embark on his fifth term in power.

Muslims and Jews face a common threat from white supremacists. We must fight it together and Mehdi Masan

The two of us have been having the exact same conversation for the past decade. About antisemitism and Islamophobia. One of us a Muslim, the other a Jew, we have conducted it in public and in private, on Twitter and on TV. We’ve agreed; we’ve argued; we’ve even wandered off topic to trade tips on how to get through a fast. Now we’ve come together because of the urgent and common threat that we face. Both of our communities are under violent attack from far-right white supremacists.

Look past the May-Corbyn Brexit talks. There’s another solution

The objections to Theresa May’s 11th hour offer to work with Labour on Brexit are obvious. It goes without saying that this is not how the process should have ended but how it should have begun, the day after the referendum or, at the very least, the day after the June 2017 election wiped out May’s Commons majority. Instead, Brexit has been like one of those high-end artworks where the narrative runs backwards. Think of it as Brexit in the style of Harold Pinter’s Betrayal, to pick a play whose title the hard Brexiters might find bleakly resonant, in which first comes the triggering of article 50 and two years of negotiations with Brussels, followed by cross-party talks to find a parliamentary consensus – when it clearly should have been the other way around.

Look past the May-Corbyn Brexit talks. There’s another solution

The objections to Theresa May’s 11th hour offer to work with Labour on Brexit are obvious. It goes without saying that this is not how the process should have ended but how it should have begun, the day after the referendum or, at the very least, the day after the June 2017 election wiped out May’s Commons majority. Instead, Brexit has been like one of those high-end artworks where the narrative runs backwards. Think of it as Brexit in the style of Harold Pinter’s Betrayal, to pick a play whose title the hard Brexiters might find bleakly resonant, in which first comes the triggering of article 50 and two years of negotiations with Brussels, followed by cross-party talks to find a parliamentary consensus – when it clearly should have been the other way around.

Beware the great betrayal myth. This debacle is the work of hard Brexiters

There is no deader horse in the kingdom than the deal brokered by Theresa May. Flogged and flogged again, it expired for a third time at 2.42pm today on the floor of the House of Commons. Something else lay dead alongside it: the illusion that the objection of MPs was not to the precise terms of Britain’s proposed exit from the European Union – contained in the withdrawal agreement – but rather to the sketched vision of our future relationship with the EU, the so-called political declaration. That fond thought was also bludgeoned to death, for MPs had the chance to vote on the withdrawal agreement alone – and they rejected it by 344 votes to 286.

Think no-deal Brexit has been taken off the table? Think again

The cliff-edge has moved a tiny bit further away, but it’s still there. Britain will not crash out of the European Union next Friday, thanks to a last act of clemency by the 27 nations we’re about to leave behind. But crashing out remains a possibility, even a likelihood. It might not be a deliberate choice made by the people of these islands, but rather an accident – the product of a series of decisions that were taken and, more often, not taken. Just as the imperial powers stumbled into a war no one wanted in 1914, so the risk remains that we will not jump off the cliff that looms ahead of us, but stumble over it.

‘They did it out of desperation’ – David Owen on the Independent Group, May’s failure and why he stands by Brexit

David Owen’s claim to be a visionary is lodged even before he opens his front door. He lives in Limehouse – in the same house where he and his fellow Labour rebels formed the breakaway Social Democratic party (SDP) in 1981, issuing the Limehouse declaration, which would change the course of British politics. It is in a part of east London that was derelict when Owen bought a burnt-out old cafe and the rooms above it for £3,000 in 1965. He was a young doctor at St Thomas’s hospital back then and this corner of Docklands was ready for the bulldozers.

May’s latest screeching U-turn makes her utterly unfit to lead

No matter how bad you think Theresa May is, she always manages to get worse. Her record of insisting on one thing, only to U-turn weeks, days or even hours later is almost impressive in its scope. There would be no snap election, she vowed – and then there was one. Her Brexit deal would be subject to a meaningful vote in December – and then the vote was pulled, punted into the new year. Brexit would happen on 29 March – and now it won’t.